Book Club News

The Bookworms Book Club will not be meeting this fall. Check our Program Schedule for information about other book clubs for children. 

The Bookworms Book Club is for children in grades 3 to 5. We meet once a month, on a Thursday, at 4:15. Children read the assigned book in advance, and we discuss the book at the meeting. If you are interested in joining, please talk to one of the Children’s Librarians.

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For our last meeting of the school year, the Bookworms read a book that took place right here in Ossining, The Road to Paris, by Nikki Grimes. We had an interesting discussion of Ossining then and now and of Paris’ life in foster care. We answered Questions from a hat, and then all the book club members gave their own book recommendations. You can see the list here. Bookworms will take a break for the summer and return in September.

Our vote:
1 worm (didn’t like it): 0
2 worms (it was okay): 0
3  worms (it was good): 0
4 worms (it was awesome): 6

The Bookworms read The Trolls, by Polly Horvath this month. Most of the group liked the book, and a few had relatives a little like Aunt Sally, who told some very tall tales. We talked about our favorite stories and characters from the book. Then we played Book Character Bingo. We played several rounds, and everyone got free books to take home.
Next month’s book is The Road to Paris, by Nikki Grimes.

Our vote:
1 worm (didn’t like it): 1
2 worms (it was okay): 1
3  worms (it was good): 1
4 worms (it was awesome): 2

For our March book, the Bookworms read The Thing About Georgie, by Lisa Graff. We wanted to see how we measured up, as far as our heights, to Georgie. It was very interesting to see how small Georgie is. Even our smallest member was taller than Georgie.
We also played Questions from a Hat. We did two rounds, and we had some very spirited discussions.
Next month’s books is The Trolls, by Polly Horvath.

Our vote:
1 worm (didn’t like it): 0
2 worms (it was okay): 0
3  worms (it was good): 2
4 worms (it was awesome): 4

The February 2013 meeting of the Bookworms book club was lots of fun. Our book was Matilda, by Road Dahl. Everyone liked the book, and they especially liked Matilda and Miss Honey. We had fun discussing our favorite pranks, and how much we disliked Miss Trunchbull. We also played several rounds of Book Bingo, which was a lot of fun. Everyone got to take home some giveaway books (ARCs of books yet to be published).
Next month’s book is The Thing About Georgie, by Lisa Graff.

Our vote:
1 worm (didn’t like it): 0
2 worms (it was okay): 0
3  worms (it was good): 1
4 worms (it was awesome): 5

The January 2013 Bookworms book was The Whipping Boy, by Sid Fleischman. Everyone liked it, but some not as much as others. We had a small group, but we still managed to have fun answering questions. Everyone agreed that having a whipping boy is a bad idea, and they all thought that they, too, would be bored stuck in a castle all the time. All the Bookworms enjoyed watching this video, which was written and acted by our 90 Second Newbery Club in the summer of 2011.
The book for next month is Matilda, by Roald Dahl.

Our vote:
1 worm (didn’t like it): 0
2 worms (it was okay): 2
3 worms (it was good): 1
4 worms (it was awesome): 2

The Bookworms book for December was Saint Louis Armstrong Beach, by Brenda Woods. A very lively group discussed how much they liked the book, how good a job the author did in describing what it was like to live through a hurricane, and how they could understand more now that they had lived through Hurricane Sandy. The group answered Questions From a Hat, and then they wanted to do another three-word-at-a-time story.
Next month’s book is The Whipping Boy, by Sid Fleischman.


Our vote:

1 worm (didn’t like it): 0
2 worms (it was okay): 0
3 1/2 worms (it was good): 4
4 worms (it was awesome): 2

The Bookworms Book Club read No Talking, by Andrew Clements, for their November meeting. We had a small but talkative group. We tried to talk only in three-word sentences for the whole meeting, but it was really hard. First we answered some three-word questions (with three-word answers). Then we wrote stories in only three-word sentences, too.

Everyone had lots of fun.
Next  month’s book is Saint Louis Armstrong Beach, by Brenda Woods.


Our vote:

1 worm (didn’t like it): 0
2 worms (it was okay): 0
3 worms (it was good): 0
4 worms (it was awesome): 6

The Bookworms September 2012 book was Guinea Dog, by Patrick Jennings. Although our group was small, it was very lively. Almost everyone thought the book was awesome. We talked about Fido, and how unusual a guinea pig he was, about Rufus’ tendency to exagerrate, and about the pet store, Petopia. When the discussion was done, we played Fictionary–everyone had a chance to draw a picture on the white board of something from the book: a person, a place, an object, or an event. Then the other book club members had to figure out what it was and how it related to the story. Everyone had a lot of fun with this game.
Next month’s book is No Talking, byAndrew Clements.

Our vote:
1 worm (didn’t like it): 0
2 worms (it was okay): 1
3 worms (it was good): 0
4 worms (it was awesome): 5

The Bookworms Book Club had their first meeting of the new school year on Thursday, September 20. We had some returning members and some new members. We didn’t read a book for this meeting, but we did spend some time talking about what we’ve been reading and what we read over the summer. Everyone was asked to recommend something for the book club to read.
Here’s what we read this summer:
Faith: Puppy Place, Harry Potter, Dork Diaries, Beverly Cleary books
Lizzy: Percy Jackson, The Hero of Olympus, Harry Potter, The Road to Paris
Ava: Percy Jackson, The Last Hero, The Ghost of Cutler Creek
Marcelo: N.E.R.D.S.
Edel: Matilda, Magic Tree House, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, A-Z Mysteries, Rainbow Magic
Here are some suggestions for book club:
N.E.R.D.S., The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Wonderstruck, The Road to Paris, One Crazy Summer, Matilda, Griffin’s Castle, 101 Dalmations.
Next month’s book is Guinea Dog, by Patrick Jennings. Our meeting is October 18.

Today the Bookworms met to discuss Touch Blue, by Cynthia Lord. All the members liked the book, with some of them wanting to rate it 20 (out of 4 possible) worms! Some of the kids knew that a similar story–an small island off the coast of Maine taking in foster children to keep their small, local school open–had actually happened in the 1060s and again in the 1980s. We also played Touch Blue Monopoly: all the questions were on Chance and Community Chest cards.
Next month’s book is Pie, by Sarah Weeks.

Our vote:
1 worm (didn’t like it): 0
2 worms (it was okay): 0
3 worms (it was good): 3
4 worms (it was awesome): 5
Didn’t read: 1

The Bookworms were almost unanimous in their love of our March 2012 book, Turtle in Paradise, by Jennifer L. Holm. They thought it was interesting, funny, and exciting. Only one dissenter thought the book was too predictable. We had lots of fun discussing whether they would like to live in Key West in 1935. (Hurricanes, scary! Outhouses–ugh!) As usual, we played Questions from a Hat.
Next month’s book is Touch Blue, by Cynthia Lord.

Our vote:
1 worm (didn’t like it):0
2 worms (it was okay): 1
3 worms (it was good): 0
4 worms (it was awesome): 9

Reactions were mixed this month in the Bookworms Book Club. Some of the kids thought our book, Cosmic, by Frank Cottrell Boyce, was out of this world. Some others thought it should be jettisoned. Either way, it was a very lively discussion. Everyone, whether they liked the book or not, participated enthusiastically in our favorite activity, Questions from a Hat.
Next month we’ll be reading Turtle in Paradise, by Jennifer L. Holm

Our vote:
1 worm (didn’t like it): 3
2 worms (it was okay): 2
3 worms (it was good): 1
4 worms (it was awesome): 2

In January 2012, the Bookworms read Lost and Found, by Andrew Clements. This is the story of a set of identical twins who, due to a clerical errors, are thought to be one person at their new school. When they decide to take turns being “Jay” and going to school, they know they will eventually get found out but decide to do it anyway.
After a brief talk about twin facts, we got to hear from our very own set of identical twins, who said they’d never pretended to be one person but thought it would be fun. Then we had a very lively round of Questions From a Hat, and ended our discussion by talking about what we thought happens after the end of the book.
Next month’s book is Cosmic, by Frank Cottrell Boyce.

Our vote:
1 worm (didn’t like it): 1
2 worms (it was okay): 1
3 worms (it was good): 1
4 worms (it was awesome): 7

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The Bookworms book for December 2011 was Regarding the Fountain, by Kate Klise. Although opinions were split about the book, and kept shifting during the meeting, feelings were generally positive. Some complaints about the book were that it was too obvious and not realistic. More favorable comments included how funny the book was. Some of the club members liked the format of the book; others didn’t. When asked, “What would you like to see in a library fountain?” all the kids had lots of ideas, ranging from money spouting out to being able to see yourself as a grownup.
Next month we’re reading Lost and Found, by Andrew Clements.

Our vote:
1 worm (didn’t like it): 2
2 worms (it was okay): 4
3 worms (it was good): 3
4 worms (it was awesome): 1

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The Bookworms met today, November 17, to talk about The Willoughbys, by Lois Lowry. Although at first some of the kids said they didn’t like the book that much, most of them came out of the meeting thinking it was a good, funny book. After rating the book, we answered “Questions From a Hat,” which led to a lot of discussion. Almost everyone had something to add to each and every question. When we’d gone all the way around the table, I asked if anyone had guessed what the new candy bar in the book would be named. This led into a discussion of Baby Ruths, and where they got their name. Everyone got a mini Baby Ruth candy to take home.
Our next meeting is December 15, and our book is Regarding the Fountain, by Kate Klise.

Our vote:
1 worm (didn’t like it): 1
2 worms (it was okay): 5
3 worms (it was good): 5
4 worms (it was awesome): 1

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The Bookworms Book Club met yesterday, October 20, 2011. We read Punished! by David Lubar. We had a very spirited group who mostly liked the book, but many of the children felt the book was too short and easy. After a short discussion of the book, we played games with words: figuring out palindromes and anagrams, thinking up oxymorons and puns, and telling knock-knock jokes.
Our next meeting is November 17, and we will be reading The Willoughbys, by Lois Lowry.

Our vote:
1 worm (didn’t like it): 0
2 worms (it was okay): 4
3 worms (it was good): 7
4 worms (it was awesome): 1

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The Bookworms had our first meeting of the 2011-2012 school year on September 22. We had our biggest crowd ever: 14 children! Many of our club members were new, so we spent a little time going over our RULES. We also played a fun game to get to know each other. Once we settled down, we all took turns talking about what we’d read during the summer. Here are some of the books the Bookworms read: Fiona: Harry Potter & Choose Your Own Adventure, Susana: Harry Potter & Ida B, Lizzie: Harry Potter, Lizzy: Harry Potter & Gideon Trilogy, Semou: Sister Magic, Colleen: Wonderstruck & I Survived, Brian G.: Throne of Fire & Harry Potter, Ralph: Magic Tree House, Viviana: Charlotte’s Web, Brian D: War of the Ember, Andy: World Records 2009, John: Invisible Inkling & Percy Jackson, O’neka: Boxcar Children and the Ice Cream Mystery, Ava: Kitt Kittredge. Our next meeting is on October 20, and we are reading Punished! by David Lubar.

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The May 2011 book for the Bookworms book club was A Room with a Zoo, by Jules Feiffer. We had a very lively meeting, and the book was a favorite of many of our book club members. We had a long, funny, and sometimes silly discussion about our own pets, and then we passed around the hat and answered questions about the book. After we had gone around the table twice, we had fun peeling off the pictures decorating the hat, and remembering all the books we’d read this year.
This was the last meeting for the Bookworms until September. We are all going to read The Phantom Tollbooth, by Norman Juster, over the summer. When we meet again in September, we will talk about that and all the other books we’ve been reading. Check back for meeting dates later in the summer.
Our vote: 6 thumbs up, 2 thumbs sideways (so-so), and 1 didn’t read.

 The Bookworms read The Secret Science Alliance and the Copycat Crook, by Eleanor Davis, for our April  2011 book. This was our first graphic novel, and it very popular. We only had one book club member who did not like the story. We had a lot of discussion about the artwork, and whether the story could have been told without it. Most of the book club members felt that the art definitely added to the story, and that it was easier to read than a chapter book. We also talked about our favorite inventions in the book, and what each of us would like to invent. We answered Questions from a Hat, and we really enjoyed the snack: Eggo waffle cereal (read the book, and you’ll  know why!).
Next month we are reading A Room with a Zoo, by Jules Feiffer.
Our vote: 6 thumbs up, 1 thumb down.

The Bookworms Book Club had our March meeting yesterday, March 17, 2011. We read Emily’s Fortune, by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor. The book was a hit with all the club members! We answered Questions from a Hat, and we had some really interesting discussions about the differences between Emily’s time and our own. No one would have liked to travel by stagecoach, or sleep in a bed at an inn with five strangers! But everyone agreed it was a good adventure, a believable story, and had really good characters.
Next month we’re reading our first graphic novel, The Secret Science Alliance and the Copycat Crook, by Eleanor Davis.
Our vote: 8 thumbs up

 

The Bookworms Book Club met in February 2011 and discussed The Small Adventure of Popeye and Elvis, by Barbara O’Connor. The discussion was very lively, and mostly everyone really liked the book. We talked about our favorite characters and part of the adventure. Most of the kids agreed that they would really like to have a chance to take a ride in the big silver motor home.
Next month: Emily’s Fortune, by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor.
Our vote: 5 thumbs up, 1 so-so

In January 2011 the Boookworms book club read Knucklehead: Tall Tales and Mostly True Stories About Growing Up Scieszca, by Jon Scieszka. This really fun biography was a big hit. We had a lot of fun talking about which crazy growing-up story each book club member liked the best. We answered Questions From a Hat. And we watched a video of Jon and other authors telling “the joke.” See it here.
Next month we read The Small Adventure of Popeye and Elvis, by Barbara O’Connor.
Our vote: 6 thumbs up, 1 didn’t read

Bookworms read Room One: A Mystery or Two, by Andrew Clements, in December 2010. Although this was another story with a one-room school, it was very different from Miss Agnes. Set in a small town in Nebraska, Ted, the only 6th grader in the school, sees a face in an upstairs window of an abandoned farmhouse, and he sets out to solve the mystery. We looked at a slide show of small-town Nebraska, answered Questions from a Hat, and played “Stare” to see how good we are at noticing clues. Next months’ books is Knucklehead: tall tales and mostly true stories about growing up Scieszka, by Jon Scieszka.
Our vote: 4 thumbs up

For November 2010, the Bookworms read The Year of Miss Agnes, by Kirkpatrick Hill. It’s the story of a girl living in a tiny village in Alaska in the 1940s, and the teacher who came to the village to teach all the children. We saw slides of a small village in Alaska, animals native to the area, and Native Americans working on drying fish, making jackets from animal skins, and more. Then we answered Questions From a Hat. It was a very lively discussion. We looked at some books about Alaska, the Iditarod, and sign language (one of the characters is deaf). Our book for next month is Room One: A Mystery or Two, by Andrew Clements.
Our vote: 6 thumbs up, 1 thumbs sideways

 

On October 21, 2010, the Bookworms book club had its second meeting of the 2010-2011 year. We discussed our first book, Igraine the Brave, by Cornelia Funke. We answered questions from a hat and wrote our own code of chivalry. Most of the group liked the book, and most of the participants said they would rather be a magician than a knight!
Our book for next month is The Year of Miss Agnes, by Kirkpatrick Hill. We’re meeting on November 18.
Our vote: 5 thumbs up, 1 thumbs down, and 1 so-so.

Here’s a photo of The Bookworms Code of Chivalry. Click on the image to enlarge it.

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The Bookworms Book Club Member Recommendations: 2010

The Famous Five (series), by Enid Blyton. Five children have a series of  adventures on their school holidays. Recommended by Eric.
Shiloh, by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor. A boy finds a lost and mistreated dog that he wants to keep, but the dog’s owner wants him back. Recommended by Brian.
Abarat, by Clive Barker. A girl from Chickentown, Minnesota, finds a foreign world populated by strange creatures. Recommended by Tony.
The Mysterious Benedict Society, by Trenton Lee Stewart. Four children attempt to save the world from being taken over by the evil twin of Mr. Benedict. Recommended by Alex.
The Mysterious Benedict Societ and the Perilous Journey, by Trenton Lee Stewart. The continuing adventures of Reynie, Sticky, Kate, and Constance, who are now on a perilous journey to find the missing Mr. Benedict. Recommended by Morgan.
Eggs, by Jerry Spinelli. A lonely 9-year-old boy becomes friends with a 13-year-old girl, and they help each other deal with what’s missing in their lives. Recommended by Lexie.
The Underneath, by Kathi Appelt. Two kittens try and find their way home, where an old dog has been chained up. Recommended by Eliana.
Because of Winn-Dixie, by Kate DiCamillo. It’s India Opal’s first summer in Florida, and she has found a dog that changes her life. Recommended by Joseph.
My recommendations:
I Am a Genius of Unspeakable Evil and I Want to Be Your Class President, by Josh Lieb. Seventh grader Oliver Watson has everyone thinking he is lazy and stupid, but he is really a rich, evil genius, and now he wants to be class president.
The Rock and the River, by Kekla Magoon. Sam’s father is a civil rights activist who works with Martin Luther King, but his brother becomes involved with the Black Panthers. Does he have to choose between the two?
The Small Adventure of Popeye and Elvis, by Barbara O’Connor. Popeye thinks his small town is the most boring place in the world, but when he meets Elvis they decide to have an adventure, and that’s just what they do.

On April 8, 2010, the Bookworms book club talked about Chasing Vermeer, by Blue Balliett. We answered some questions about the book: about the mystery, the illustrations (who found the clues in them?), and what we would have done if we were in the same situation. Book club member got to eat a blue M & M (just like Calder and Petra) when they answered questions. For more information about Chasing Vermeer and Blue Balliett’s other mysteries with Petra and Calder, check out this web site: http://www.scholastic.com/blueballiett/.  There are online games involving art, mysteries, and pentominoes, too.
Next month we will be having our annual Reading Roundup. Each book club member will bring in a book to recommend to the group, and we will vote on our favorite book club book of the year.
Our vote: 8 thumbs up, 1 didn’t read

The Bookworms met on March 4, 2010, and discussed 11 Birthdays, by Wendy Mass. We talked about genres, and some of the members said they were surprised when it turned out the book was a fantasy, not realistic fiction. We also talked about do-overs, and whether we would want one. (Most of the members said yes.) And we talked about the consequences of all our actions, and whether it’s okay to do something you know is wrong if there will be no consequences, because the next day never comes.
Our vote: 8 thumbs up, 1 thumbs down, 2 thumbs sideways

  The Bookworms Book Club met on February 4, 2010, to talk about We Can’t All be Rattlesnakes, by Patrick Jennings.  Most of the group really liked the book, which is about a gopher snake named Crusher who is captured by a boy named Gunnar. We discussed the book, answered Questions From a Hat, and had a yummy snack!
Our book for next month is 11 Birthdays, by Wendy Mass.
Our vote: 6 thumbs up, 1 thumb down, and 3 sideways (so-so).

 The Bookworms Book Club met yesterday, January 7,  2010, here at the Ossining Public Library. The book we discussed was The Magic Half, by Annie Barrows. Opinions on the book were split: Eliana, Eric, Brian, Tony, Jeffrey and Reid really liked it. Joseph, T.J., and Morgan really didn’t like it. At first Alex said he didn’t like it, but then he changed his mind and said it was okay.
The discussion was very spirited.  We also heard some facts about twins. There’s lots of information about twins and the book at Annie Barrows’ web site: http://www.anniebarrows.com/magichalf.
Our book for next month is We Can’t All be Rattlesnakes, by Patrick Jennings.
Our vote: 7 thumbs up, 3 thumbs down.
The Bookworms book club discussed Dog Friday, by Hilary McKay, on December 10, 2009. We had a very lively discussion, beginning with a game of hangman and the statement: Every book is a mystery. Not everyone agreed with the statement. We also talked about the characters, the plot, and what the book was really about–it was agreed that it was about overcoming your fears. Even though most of the group said they didn’t like the book, there was a lot to talk about.
Our book for next month is The Magic Half, by Annie Barrows.
Our vote: 2 thumbs up, and 8 thumbs down.
 
Frindle, by Andrew Clements, was our book for November 2009. We had a group of 10 Bookworms, most of whom really liked the book. We had a very lively, sometimes loud, discussion, answered Questions From a Hat, and finished with a snack. Next month, we will be reading Dog Friday, by Hilary  McKay.
Our vote: 4 double thumbs up, 2 thumbs up, and 2 thumbs sideways (so-so).
Calling all Bookworms!
The Ossining Public Library welcomed back the Bookworms book club for its first meeting for the 2009-2010 school year yesterday, October 1. We had nine children, including 5 brand new members! We played some games to get to know each other, went over The Rules, talked about what we’d all read this summer, and had a snack. The next meeting is on November 5, and our book is Frindle, by Andrew Clements. If you are interested, let us know, and we will give you a copy of the book to read.

Here are some of the books we read over the summer:

Morgan and Alex read The Mysterious Benedict Society, Brian read Star Wars Clone Wars,  T.J. read Stormbreaker, Tony read about Greek mythology, Joseph read Captain Underpants, Lexie read Clementine, Eric read The Lighthouse Mystery (Boxcar Children #8), Jeffrey read Shiloh, and I read The London Eye Mystery.

Fall is for Bookworms!

The Bookworms Book Club will begin meeting again this fall. Our first meeting will be on Thursday, October 1, at 4:15 pm. Rather than have a book discussion for our first meeting, we’ll just get together, talk about what we’ve read this summer, and get the book for the next meeting. And, of course, have some snacks!

Here’s what we’ll read next:

November 5: Frindle, by Andrew Clements

December 10: Dog Friday, by Hilary McKay

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A Celebration of Reading!

Eight Bookworm Book Club members and one guest joined me on Friday for our final meeting of this school year. We all took turns talking about books we like and recommend to other readers.

Here are the books we all liked:

Swindle, by Gordon Korman: After unscrupulous collector S. Wendell Palamino cons him out of a valuable baseball card, sixth-grader Griffin Bing puts together a band of misfits to break into Palomino’s heavily guarded store and steal the card back, planning to use the money to finance his father’s failing invention, the SmartPick fruit picker.  Recommended by Reid.

Stormbreaker, by Anthony Horowitz. After the death of the uncle who had been his guardian, fourteen-year-old Alex Rider is coerced to continue his uncle’s dangerous work for Britain’s intelligence agency, MI6. Recommended by Alex.

The Neddiad: How Neddie took the train, went to Hollywood, and saved civilization, by Daniel Pinkwater. When shoelace heir Neddie Wentworthstein and his family take the train from Chicago to Los Angeles in the 1940s, he winds up in possession of a valuable Indian turtle artifact whose owner is supposed to be able to prevent the impending destruction of the world, but he is not sure exactly how. Recommended by Tony.

The Kite Fighters, by Linda Sue Park. In Korea in 1473, eleven-year-old Young-sup overcomes his rivalry with his older brother Kee-sup, who as the first-born son receives special treatment from their father, and combines his kite-flying skill with Kee-sup’s kite-making skill in an attempt to win the New Year kite-fighting competition. Recommended by Michaela.

The Legend of Luke, by Brian Jacques. When Martin the Warrior leaves Redwall Abbey and embarks upon a journey to the place of his birth, he learns about the brave and noble deeds of his father Luke, a real Warrior Chieftain. Recommended by Noah.

The Last Battle (Book 7 of the Chronicles of Narnia), by C.S. Lewis. When evil comes to Narnia, Jill and Eustace help fight the great last battle and Aslan leads his followers to a glorious new paradise. Recommended by Josiah.

Redwall, by Brian Jacques. When the peaceful life of ancient Redwall Abbey is shattered by the arrival of the evil rat Cluny and his villainous hordes, Matthias, a young mouse, determines to find the legendary sword of Martin the Warrior which, he is convinced, will help Redwall’s inhabitants destroy the enemy. Recommended by Andrew.

Clockwork: or all wound up, by  Philip Pullman. Long ago in Germany, a storyteller’s story and an apprentice clockwork-maker’s nightmare meet in a menacing, lifelike figure created by the strange Dr. Kalmenius. Recommended by Jeffrey.

Kingdom Keepers, by Ridley Pearson. Thirteen-year-old Finn Whitman and four other young teens have been transformed into holograms to be guides for visitors to Disney World. When Finn is unexpectedly transported to the Magic Kingdom in his hologram form, Wayne, an Imagineer, tells him that he and the other guides must save the park from the scheming witch Maleficent and the Overtakers.  Recommended by Reid.

Running Out of Time, by Margaret Peterson Haddix. When a diphtheria epidemic hits her 1840 village, thirteen-year-old Jessie discovers it is actually a 1995 tourist site under unseen observation by heartless scientists, and it’s up to Jessie to escape the village and save the lives of the dying children. Recommended by Alex.

My recommendations:

Eleven, by Patricia Reilly Giff. When Sam, who can barely read, discovers an old newspaper clipping just before his eleventh birthday, it brings forth memories from his past, and, with the help of a new friend at school and the castle they are building for a school project, his questions are eventually answered.

The Yggyssey: How Iggy wondered what happened to all the ghosts, found out where they went, and went there, by Daniel Pinkwater. In the mid-1950s, Yggdrasil Birnbaum and her friends, Seamus and Neddie, journey to Old New Hackensack, which is on another plane, to try to learn why ghosts are disappearing from the Birnbaum’s hotel and other Hollywood, California, locations. (A follow-up, sort of, to The Neddiad).

The True Meaning of Smekday, by Adam Rex. When her mother is abducted by aliens on Christmas Eve (or “Smekday” Eve since the Boov invasion), 11 year-old Tip hops in the family car and heads south to find her and meets an alien Boov mechanic who agrees to help her and save the planet from disaster.

Knucklehead: Tall tales and mostly true stories of growing up Scieszka, by Jon Scieszka. How did Jon Scieszka get so funny? He grew up as one of six brothers with Catholic school, lots of comic books, lazy summers at the lake with time to kill, babysitting misadventures, TV shows, and jokes told at family dinner.

Come on into the library this summer to find these and many more great books!

Here is the latest information about the Bookworms Book Club at the Ossining Public Library

Bookworms Reading Celebration!!

Calling all Bookworms book club members: We will have our last meeting of the school year on Friday, May 29, 2009, from 4:00 to 4:45.  (Please note: the date on the flyers that were handed out at the April meeting are wrong.)

We do not have an assigned book to read this month. Instead, please bring in one book to share that we have not read in book club, and be prepared to tell the other members why they should read it. If you’d like, you can bring a snack to share at this book party!

If you have any questions, come by and see us, or call us at 941-2416, ext. 337 or 338.

 Donuthead, by Sue Stauffacher, was discussed in the April 2009 Bookworms book club meeting. Everyone really liked the book. We answered questions from a hat, and we talked about what kinds of things make us really happy.
Our vote: 3 thumbs up

Sheep, by Valerie Hobbs, was discussed at the March 2009 Bookworms Book Club meeting. We talked about border collies, what kinds of jobs dogs do, and we answered questions from a hat.
Our vote: 4 thumbs up, 3 so-so, and 1 didn’t finish
Here are some interesting web sites about border collies:
http://www.gis.net/~shepdog/BC_Museum/index.html
http://www.abcollie.com/
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/bordercollie.htm
http://www.bordercollie.org/core.html

  The Willoughbys, by Lois Lowry, was discussed at the February 2009 Bookworms Book Club meeting. We answered Questions From a Hat, we talked about the glossary, and we talked about which books in the bibliography we had read. Some book club members made their own travel brochures. You can hear Lois Lowry read from the book at: http://www.boston.com/lifestyle/specials/mehegan_lowry/
Our vote: 7 thumbs up, 0 thumbs down
Cover
 Babe the Gallant Pig, by Dick King-Smith, was discussed at the January 2009 Bookworms Book Club meeting. We talked about what other books this one reminded us of (Charlotte’s Web), why it is better to be nice than to be mean, our favorite characters, and we made some videos about the book.
Our vote: 8 thumbs up, 1 not read
 Punished, by David Lubar was discussed at the November 2008 Bookworms Book Club meeting. We talked about oxymorons, anagrams, and palindromes, and we played some games with words.
The Kid Who Ran For President, by Dan Gutman, was discussed at the October 2008 Bookworms Book Club meeting.  We talked about elections and whether a kid should run for president–and whether anyone would really vote for a kid.
The Homework Machine, by Dan Gutman, was discussed by the Bookworms Book Club at the September 2008 meeting. We talked about homework, whether it was okay for the kids to use a homework machine, and friendship. Then we pretended to be grownups whose kids develop some kind of machine.
Our vote: 8 thumbs up, 1 thumb down
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5 Responses to Book Club News

  1. [...] Club News By oplkids Check out the latest about the Bookworms book club. Just click on http://oplkids.wordpress.com/book-club-news/ to see what we’ve been [...]

  2. Linda Lichtenstein says:

    I would like to know if you have the book club group in the summer. If not are you looking for someone to run it?

    What other reading programs do you have in the summer? Do you have any reading comprehension programs?

    • oplkids says:

      We don’t usually run our book club in the summer. We are not looking for someone to run it. We will pick up again in September.
      We run a summer reading club from the end of school until early September. Children sign up, read books, and win free books as prizes.

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